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Music Term: Accordion

A
A 2
A ballata
A battuta
A bene placito
A capella
A cappella
A capriccio
A due
A la hausse
A niente
A piacere
A poco
A prima vista
A punta d'arco
A punto d'arco
A tempo
A weighting
A, a
A-cappella
A-flat
A-sharp
A/d
A?da trumpet
Ab
Abandon
Abbellimento
Abbreviations
Abellimenti
Abendmusik
Aber
Abhoga
Abnehmend
Abschnitt
Absolute music
Absolute phase
Absolute pitch
Absorption
Absorption wave meter
Abstract music
Abstrich
Abzug
Ac
Acalanto
Accarezzevole
Accel.
Accelerando
Accelerando, accel.
Accelerez
Accelerometer
Accent
Accentato
Acceso
Acciaccatura
Accidental
Accidentals
Accolada
Accolade
Accompagnato
Accompanied
Accompaniment
Accompany
Accopiato
Accord
Accordatura
Accorde
Accordeon
Accordion
Accordo
Accuse
Achal
Achromatic
Achtel
Achtelnote
Achtelpause
Acid rock
Acme siren
Acorn tube
Acoustic
Acoustic amplifier
Acoustic bass
Acoustic drums
Acoustic echo chamber
Acoustical
Acoustical absorption
Acoustical analysis
Acoustical consultant
Acoustical environment
Acoustical instrument
Acoustics
Action
Active satellite
Actuator
Acute
Acutus
Ad lib
Ad libitum
Adagietto
Adagio
Adagissimo
Adante
Adaptation
Adat
Added sixth
Additive meter
Adiagietto
Adjutant's call
Adorno
Adsr
Advent
Aeolian
Aeolian harp
Aeolian mode
Aequalstimmen
Aerophone
Aerophones
Aerophor
Aes
Aes/aes-256
Aes/ebu
Aes/ebu professional interface
Affabilita
Affabilmente
Affanato, affanoso
Affannato
Affannoso
Affections, doctrine of
Affettuoso
Affettuoso, affettuosamente, or affectueusement
Affetuoso
Affibile
Afflito
Affrettando
Agevole
Agiatamente
Agile
Agilita
Agitato
Agnus dei
Agogic
Agogic accent
Agogo bells
Agraffe
Agrements
Ainote
Air
Air tune
Airborne noise
Airborne sound
Ais
Akathistos
Akoluthia
Akzent
Al a la
Al fine
Al, alla
Alaap
Alankar
Alba
Albero di marchio
Albero di sonagli
Alberti bass
Albumblatt
Aleatory
Aleatory music
Aliasing
All' ottava
Alla all'
Alla breve
Alla breve or cut time
Alla caccia
Alla marcia
Alla siciliano
Allant
Allarg.
Allargando
Allegretto
Allegretto vivace
Allegrissimo
Allegro
Alleluia
Allemand
Allemande
Allentando
Alliteration
Allmaehlich
Alma redemptoris mater
Alphorn
Alpine horn
Als
Alt
Alteration
Altered and open tunings
Altered chord
Alternate picking
Alternate singing
Alternating current
Alternativo
Altgeige
Althorn
Altissimo
Alto
Alto clarinet
Alto clef
Alto crumhorn
Alto flute
Alto horn
Alto recorder
Alto saxhorn
Alto saxophone
Alto trombone
Alzate sordini
Am frosch
Am griffbret
Am griffbrett
Am steg
Amabile
Ambience
Ambient field
Ambient micing
Ambient noise/sound
Ambitus
Ambrosian chant
Amen
Amen cadence
American nationalism
Amore
Amorevole
Amoroso
Amp
Ampere
Amphibrach
Amplification
Amplifier
Amplitude
Anacrusis
Analog
Analog recording
Analog to digital converter
Analysis
Anapest
Anche
Ancia
Ancora
Andacht
Andante
Andantino
Andolan
Anfang
Ang
Anglaise
Angoscioso
Anhemitonic
Anima
Animated
Animato
Anime
Anlaufen
Anmutig
Anonymous
Anreissen
Ansatz
Anschlag
Anschwellend
Answer
Antar gandhar
Antara
Antecedent
Anthem
Antibacchius
Anticipation
Antico
Antienne
Antinode
Antiphon
Antiphonal
Antique cymbals
Antithesis
Antwort
Antya
Anuvadi
Anvil
Anwachsend
Apaise
Aperto
Appagiatura
Appasionato
Appassionato
Appenato
Applied music
Appoggiando
Appoggiatura
Aquitainian organum
Arabesque
Arbol de marca
Arcato
Arch
Archet
Architectural acoustics
Archlute
Arcicembalo
Arco
Ardente
Ardito
Ardore
Area effect
Aria
Arietta
Arioso
Armonica
Armure
Arohi
Arpa
Arpadeboca
Arpeggation
Arpeggiated chord
Arpeggiato
Arpeggio
Arrange
Arrangement
Ars antiqua
Ars antiqua ("old art"), also "ars vetus"
Ars nova
Ars subtilior
Arsis and thesis
Art rock
Art song
Articulation
Articulation class
Articulation index (ai)
Artificial harmonics
As
As is
Ascap
Ascending
Ashi dai
Asperges me
Aspiratamente
Assai
Assembly
Assez
Assign
Assistant engineer
Assistive listening device
Asta
Asthai
Asthan
Asymmetric meter
Atabal
Atarigane, or chanchiki
Atempause
Atom
Atonal
Atonality
Attacca
Attack
Attention
Attenuation
Au talon
Aubade
Audava
Audio
Audition
Aufgeregt
Aufsatz
Aufschnitt
Aufstrich
Auftakt
Augmentation
Augmented
Augmented chord
Augmented chords
Augmented intervals
Augmented sixth chord
Aural training
Ausdruck
Ausdrucksvoll
Aushalten
Auslosung
Ausweichung
Authentic cadence
Authentic mode
Authenticity
Autographs, musical
Autoharp
Automatic gain control
Automation
Aux send
Auxiliary equipment
Auxiliary percussion
Auxiliary tone
Avant-garde
Avarohi
Ave maria
Ave regina
Avec
Avirbhav
Axatse
Axe
Axis
Ayre
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 1-9

Accordion
Definition and background:
Aerophone, Free Reed Instrument, Wind instrument; The accordion was invented by Friedrich Buschmann in 1822 in Berlin. He called invention the Hand'oline. In 1829, Cyrillus Damian of Vienna created another version of this instrument and gave it the name of accordion because of the addition of buttons, played by the left hand, that sounded chords.("Accord" is the French term for chord.) Eventually, the name accordion was used for all instrument of this type. It has been a popular instrument through the years with large organizations over the world created for accordion enthusiasts. It has been popular in many cultures as the main instrument in several musical genres. These include cajun zydeco from America, polka of Europe and America, Latino polka of Mexico, tango of Argentina, and classical transcriptions of European composers of the 19th and 20th centuries. There have also been several serious composers that have written works for the accordion including Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Dmitri Shostakovich, Roy Harris, and Alban Berg. The accordion is a portable wind instrument consisting of two reed organs connected by a folding bellows. Expanding and contracting the bellows provides air to vibrate the reed organs producing the sounds. It is also known as a squeeze box because of this expanding and contracting of the bellows. There is a keyboard on the right side for playing melody notes and buttons on the left to sound bass notes and full chords. A second type of accordion contains buttons on both left and right sides which includes the concertina and Bandoneon. The keyboard on the right side of the accordion typically contains 41 keys but the smaller models can contain as few as 25. The full "concert accordion" will typically have four sets of reeds called treble shifts, one set tuned in unison, a second set tuned one octave higher, a third tuned one octave lower, and the fourth set, the tremulant, tuned slightly higher than unison. The left hand operates the bellows and each change of direction of the bellows will produce a new attack of the notes that are desired by the keys or buttons that are depressed. The speed of the expansion and contraction also effects dynamics and the shapness of the attacks. It also operated the bass buttons with the larger instruments having as many as 120 bass buttons with six rows of twenty buttons. There is also a button with no reeds operated by the left hand that allows the bellows to expand or contract without sounding any pitch. On this instrument, the fifth and sixth row (farthest from the hand) consists of the counterbass row and the fundamental bass row of buttons that sound individual low notes containing all twelve chromatic pitches. The fourth row consists of buttons that sound a major triad. The third row consists of buttons that sound minor triads. The second row consists of buttons that sound dominant seventh chords and the final row consists of buttons that sound diminished seventh chords. These buttons are arranged in the circle of fifths. These pitches can also be doubled an octave lower with the treble shifts (lower octave) selected. The accordion has a very rich, reedy and organ-like sound. The accordion has the ability to play single or multiple notes on the keyboard (right side) as well as chords on the left side. The tone quality of the melody notes can be altered by changing between the combinations of reeds (treble shifts) as discussed above. A universal system of labels has been given to these treble shifts for the composer to designate specific sounds. Table of Treble Shifts and Labels Unison only Unison & Lower Octave Lower Octave only Unison & Higher Octave Higher Octave only Unison & Tremulant Higher Octave & Lower Octave Unison, Higher Octave & Lower Octave Unison, Higher Octave & Tremulant Unison, Lower Octave & Tremulant Master (all sets) Additional notation is required to indicate the direction of the bellows. An arrow pointing to the left directs the performer to open the bellows and an arrow to the right directs the performer to close the bellows. An effect called a bellow shake is basically a rapid in and out movement of the bellows. The notation of "B.N." will end the effect indicating "bellows normal." Table of Bellow Markings Open Bellows Close Bellows Bellow shake Bellows normal B.N. The accordion is capable of a large dynamic range from very soft to very loud. Loud dynamic levels with several notes and full chords sounding require more air and cannot sustain the notes for more than a few seconds. Softer dynamic levels with fewer notes depressed can be sustained longer. The basic accordion keyboard range spans from F below the treble clef staff to the fifth space A above the treble clef staff. The treble shifts provide an additional octave higher and lower than the basic range. Both the counterbass and fundamental bass pitches begin at the D below the bass clef staff and go to the D in the bass clef staff. The chords (major, minor, dominant seventh, and diminished seventh) range from the E-flat in the bass clef staff to the D above the bass clef staff. Using the treble shifts, the fundamental bass and counterbass ranges can be extended from the D-flat five lines below the bass clef staff to the B in the treble clef staff. The chords can be extended from the G-flat in the fourth space below the bass clef staff to the F above the bass clef staff. See also concertina; [Ger.] Bandoneon. Also [Fr.] accord'on, [Ger.] Ziehharmonika [It.] fisarmonica.
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Last Updated: 2017-11-17 17:55:18
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