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Music Term: Electric guitar

E
E-flat
E-flat alto saxhorn
E-flat horn
E-sharp
Ear
Ear training
Early motet
Early music
Early reflections
Easy listening music
Ebollimento
Ecclesia
Ecclesiastical modes
Echappee
Echappement
Echegiatta
Echelette
Echelle
Echo
Echo attachment
Echo chamber
Echo cornet
Echo flutter
Echo organ
Echo return
Echo send
Echo send control
Eclatant
Eclecticism
Eclogue
Eco
Ecossaise
Ecphonetic notation
Edge-blown aerophone
Editing
Effects
Effects cymbal
Effects track
Egg shakers
Eguale
Ei
Eighth
Eighth note
Eighth rest
Eihechouchou
Eilen
Eilend
Eilig
Ein wenig
Einfach
Eingang
Einhalt
Einheit
Einigkeit
Einklang
Einlage
Einsatz
Einschlafen
Einstimmig
Eis
Eisteddfod
Eitetsu okedo daiko, kakko
Ek tal
Elaboration
Elargissent
Electret
Electret condenser
Electric
Electric bass
Electric current
Electric guitar
Electric piano
Electricity
Electro pneumatic action
Electro-acoustic music
Electro-magnetic interference (emi)
Electromagnetic field
Electromagnetic induction or pick up
Electromagnetic theory
Electronic
Electronic drums
Electronic instrument
Electronic instruments
Electronic music
Electronic organ
Electrons
Electrophone
Electrostatic charge
Elegante
Elegy
Eleven stroke roll
Eleventh
Elmuahim
Embellishment
Embolada
Embossed decoration
Embouchure
Empfindung
Empresse
Emu
En dehors
En pressant
En retenant
Enchainement
Enchainez
Enchiriadis
Enclume
Encore
Endorsement
Energia
Energico
Enfatico
Engfuhrung
Engineer
Englischhorn
English fingerings
English flute
English horn
English school
Engraved decoration
Enharmonic
Enharmonic valve
Enharmonics
Ensalada
Ensemble
Ensou
Ente
Entr'acte
Entrada
Entree
Entremes
Entry
Entschieden
Enunciation
Envelope
Envoi
Envoy
Eoliphone
Epilogue
Epinette
Episema
Episode
Epithalamium
Epitritus
Eponge
Eqale, equali
Equal loudness contours
Equal temperament
Equal temperament.
Equal voices
Equale
Equalization
Equipment rack
Er hu
Era
Ergriffen
Erloeschend
Ermattend
Ernst
Eroico
Erotic
Error concealment
Error correct
Error detection
Erzaehler
Erzlaute
Es
Escapement
Esercizio
Espinette
Espirando
Espressione
Espressivo
Espressivo or espr.
Espringale
Esquinazo
Estampe
Estampie
Estilo
Estino
Estinto
Estribillo
Et
Eteint
Ethnomusicology
Ethos
Etouffe
Etouffez
Etude
Etwas
Eufonio
Euouae
Euphonium
Eurhythmics
Evaded cadence
Evangelium
Even tuning
Evensong
Ewe drums
Excercise
Exequiae
Exercise
Exoticism
Expander
Expansion
Expansion ratio
Exposed fifths
Exposed octaves
Exposition
Expression
Expression marks
Expressionism
Expressive organ
Extemporise
External taper
Extravaganza
Eye music
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 1-9

Electric guitar
Definition and background:
Electrophone, Chordophone, Stringed InstrumentThe desire to increase the sound volume of the acoustic guitar existed long before the development of electronic amplifiers and speakers. As the musical performances in the 19th century grew to larger concert settings and ensembles, musicians needed louder instruments. New materials and instrument designs made this possible to some extent. The introduction of steel strings in the 19th century provided greater volume, but but required major changes in the instrument's design to account for the increased tension of the strings. In the 20th century, public dance music became more popular and by the 1920's, the early recording equipment needed a realatively loud volume to capture a musical performance. By the end of the 1930s, electronic amplification proved to be one of the most successful innovations for building a louder guitar. It was clear that country and jazz guitarists were eager to experiment and were the leaders in the development of the electric guitar sounds. Several electric guitars were introduced and sold, but they still had problems (distortion, feedback, and unwanted overtones). The distortion was often due to the acoustic design of the guitars. The presence of a vibrating chamber ( soundbox) or soundboard made it difficult to amplify these sounds without producing feedback or distortion. It became clear that the solid- body was the ideal design. The solid- body basically meant that the only vibrations being amplified are from the strings themselves. There are no other vibrations to distort or provide unwanted overtones. Although the first solid- body electric guitar commercially available was the 1939 Slingerland, it wasn't until 1949 when the first successful solid- body electric guitar was sold by Leo Fender. The guitar was called the Esquire and later was renamed Broadcaster and finally took the name of Telecaster. Based on the success of the Esquire, the Gibson Guitar Company went back to famed guitarist Les Paul and looked at his designs that he had been promoting for over 10 years. Finally, in 1952 Gibson came out with (what would eventually be) the famous Les Paul model solid- body electric guitar. By the 1960's, the electric guitar reached maturity with the introduction of the semi-hollow body electric guitar (used by B.B. King and Chuck Berry) and the Fender Stratocaster (used by Jimmy Hendrix). Few major innovations in electric guitar design have been made since then. Other physical innovations to the electric guitar included a tremolo arm that allowed the performer to bend the pitch. Most of the other innovations were in the sounds of the electric guitar through the large advances in electronics. Today, electric guitars are found in almost every popular musical ensemble, not just country and jazz. With advances in electronics, the electric guitar can easliy reproduce the sounds of an acoustic guitar as well as the high-energy sounds of rock and heavy metal.The modern electric guitar is a solid- body instrument, visually similar to the acoustic guitar, but thinner. It has no soundbox and no vibrating soundboard. It has six strings just like the acoustic guitar. It has a long neck like a guitar and typically fretted. The six strings are held in place with the tailpiece at one end of the instrument and by the tuning pegs at the end of the neck. The tuning pegs are mechanical screws. An electrical pickup is positioned under the strings near the bridge and turns the vibrations of the strings into electrical impulses that are sent to an amplifier. A 1/4" phono plug in the body of the instrument is used to connect to the amplifier. The electric guitar requires an amplifier to amplify the frequencies of the vibrating strings that are sensed by the pickup. The amplifier takes these signals and processes them into louder and often altered sounds that are then sent to a speaker so they can be heard. The amplifier and sound processors in the amplifier are what provides the range of sounds that make the electric guitar such a versatile instrument.One of the biggest challenges of amplifying an acoustic guitar was the fact that the hollow body allowed for a great deal of resonance and vibrations from a number of sources ( strings,soundbox, soundboard, etc.) are all amplified, often creating a jumbled sound. A solid- body has more mass and less vibration, so the pickup reproduces a cleaner signal of the pure vibrations of the strings. Since there is no acoustic resonator, the instrument's sounds are largely determined by the electronic amplifier and sound processors that it is connected to. The sounds range from a "pure" amplification of the strings (that can provide a sound similar to an acoustic guitar) to the distorted electronic sounds found in some heavy metal or rock music. These sounds can also be altered by the techniques of attacking the notes ( striking, plucking or slapping the strings). Guitar effects boxes, such as the fuzz box and the wah-wah have been a staple of the electric guitar's sounds for many years. Other colors and textures, like distortion, reverberation ( reverb), feedback, using the electric guitar's tremolo arm and playing close to the amplifier are also common and allow musicians to alter, bend, and sustain notes.The electric guitar has the same range as the acoustic guitar. The lowest note (top string) is E (written E on the bass clef staff) and sounds an octave lower than written. The six strings are E, A, d, g, b, e 1.
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Last Updated: 2017-12-18 05:23:08
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